Like Bake a Cake

Tweets by @karlbakeman   

Karl Bakeman lives in New York and edits books.

August 20, 2014 at 2:41pm
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Another universal pattern is that as soon as a popular reading culture gets established, commentators start worrying about the decline of reading.

— Griswold et al,’s “Reading and the Reading Class in the Twenty-First Century.” 

(Source: academia.edu)

August 18, 2014 at 2:50pm
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Jules Goddard & Tony Eccles

Jules Goddard & Tony Eccles

(Source: powells.com)

August 16, 2014 at 10:38am
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A return to the elephant of college pricing  →

Excellent collection of data on the costs of college.

August 15, 2014 at 2:23pm
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Where people in NY and TX were born. Cool series of graphics.

(Source: The New York Times)

12:09pm
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"For all those excited today to get their hands on the “new” Google Classroom: recognize that you’re actually adopting some very very old technologies.”

"For all those excited today to get their hands on the “new” Google Classroom: recognize that you’re actually adopting some very very old technologies.”

August 10, 2014 at 3:55pm
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If our book consumption remains as low as it has been, at least let us admit that it is because reading is a less exciting pastime than going to the dogs, the pictures or the pub, and not because books, whether bought or borrowed, are too expensive.

— George Orwell

(Source: nyti.ms)

July 27, 2014 at 9:33am
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Fail better,” Samuel Beckett commanded, a phrase that has been taken on by business executives as some kind of ersatz wisdom. They have missed the point completely. Beckett didn’t mean failure-on-the-way-to-delayed-success, which is what the FailCon crowd thinks he meant. To fail better, to fail gracefully and with composure, is so essential because there’s no such thing as success. It’s failure all the way down.

— Stephen Marche

(Source: nyti.ms)

July 9, 2014 at 6:23am
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We’re still pretending that we’re inventing a brain when all we’ve come up with is a giant mash-up of real brains. We don’t yet understand how brains work, so we can’t build one.”

When machines translate from one language to another, they are leeching from live translators, taking matching phrases from aggregated data. If tech companies could gather similar data on doctors, that information could theoretically be matched up to make a simulated doctor.

“People are unwittingly feeding information into the Cloud for automated services, which they’re not being paid for,” Lanier said. “I don’t like pretending that humans are becoming buggy whips. You have this fantasy that it’s machines doing it without people helping. We are throwing people out of work based on a fantasy.”

— Maureen Dowd & Jaron Lanier, http://nyti.ms/1xPuswC

June 22, 2014 at 4:28pm
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Every memorable class is a bit like a jazz composition. There is the basic melody that you work with. It is defined by the syllabus. But there is also a considerable measure of improvisation against that disciplining background.

— Mark Edmundson

(Source: higheredmanagement.net)

June 7, 2014 at 10:01am
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We need bots that are the algorithmic equivalent of the Wobblies’ Little Red Songbook, bots that fan the flames of discontent. We need bots of conviction.

— Mark Sample